Category Archives: prosperity

Money: That’s What I Want

We heard a little bit of the classic song “Money (That’s What I Want)” last week from Bruno Mars.

Now let’s hear the whole thing, complete with screaming teenage girls, from one of the most popular bands of all time: The Beatles.

This song is guaranteed to get you into the prosperity mindset crucial for attracting more money.

“Money (That’s What I Want)”

The best things in life are free
But you can keep them for the birds and bees
Now give me money
That’s what I want
That’s what I want, yeah
That’s what I want

Your lovin’ gives me a thrill
But your lovin’ don’t pay my bills
Now give me money
That’s what I want
That’s what I want, yeah
That’s what I want

Money don’t get everything it’s true
What it don’t get, I can’t use
Now give me money
That’s what I want
That’s what I want, yeah
That’s what I want, wah

Money don’t get everything it’s true
What it don’t get, I can’t use
Now give me money
That’s what I want
That’s what I want, yeah
That’s what I want

Well now give me money
A lot of money
Wow, yeah, I wanna be free
Oh I want money
That’s what I want
That’s what I want, well

Now give me money
A lot of money
Wow, yeah, you need money
Now, give me money
That’s what I want, yeah
That’s what I want

Bruno Mars: Money and Billionaire

We’ve shown several music videos related to wealth and money recently, but this amateur video of Bruno Mars performing acoustically at a private party is really unique.

He’s doing a mashup of the old classic “Money (That’s What I Want)” and his own hit “Billionaire”.

Go ahead and sing along to get into the wealth-attracting mindset.

I wanna be a billionaire so freakin’ bad
Buy all of the things I never had
I wanna be on the cover of Forbes magazine
Smiling next to Oprah and the Queen

Oh, every time I close my eyes
I see my name in shining lights
Yeah, a different city every night
Oh, I swear the world better prepare
For when I’m a billionaire

How to Actually Get Rich

4355915You may have wondered how to cut through all the information out there and figure out exactly how to actually get rich.

As we’ve talked about before here, “The only way you will ever get rich is by creating a product, being a producer, and making massive sales and skyrocketing your income,” says Victor Pride of Bold & Determined.

He goes on to explain:

You don’t get rich by having a limited income and saving a portion of that limited income.

That’s the silly little fib that has been sold to you.

Saving money is reactive. You don’t get rich by reaction, you get rich by proaction.

You have to be a producer to get rich. A money saver is a reducer.

[Tweet "You have to be a producer to get rich. A money saver is a reducer."]

Pride prides himself (pun was inevitable!) on living a simple life, and hates complication. That includes the way he speaks and spells it out. He is more concerned with motivating you and firing you up than with not offending you.

You and you alone have to keep a keen eye on your assets, you and you alone can provide for your future. You are responsible for you, give up responsibility and you have no right to complain when it doesn’t work out for you.

A few simple rules to live by:

  1. Trust no one – Unless you are someone’s loving and devoted wife or mother no one gives a damn about your future. Least of all ‘money managers’. Point the finger inward, never outward. It’s your job and your responsibility to make sure you have a future. It pays to be paranoid. Verify everything.
  2. Produce income – Wealth isn’t coming to you via a paycheck and $3 saved daily on a cup of coffee. It is coming from production, from action, from earning more money.
  3. Live below your means – You simply cannot be in debt lest you want to work in a 9-5 job forever. Debt is slavery, money and time is freedom. Think big to live little. Cut down the big expenses like housing, automobile, higher education, credit card debt, cell phone bill etc. When your biggest bills are tiny you can afford all the little coffee’s you want. Big expenses do not increase quality of life, they increase stress. No bills, no stress.
  4. Take action when opportunity presents itself – The real reason to save money, to use it to make more money.
[Tweet "The joke: To get rich, save your money from your limited income stream and be rich in 40 or 50 years."]

The reality: To get rich make a lot more money now.

Read the full story on BoldAndDetermined.com.

10 Habits of the Prosperous

book_dbhWhat do the prosperous do that most people don’t? What are the beliefs and habits of the prosperous that allow them to accumulate wealth?

The following is an excerpt from the book DoesYour Bag Have Holes by Cameron C. Taylor.

1.  Clear Monitored Financial Goals — Charles Coonradt, author of The Game of Work wrote, “If you put one hundred people in a room and ask them how many would like to be financially independent, all the hands will go up. If you then ask them how many have a personal financial statement detailing assets, liabilities, and net worth that is current in the last ninety days . . . ninety of those hundred people will not raise their hands. If you ask those remaining ten people how many have that financial statement laid out in a pro forma goals format for one, three, five, ten and twenty year periods, nine of the people will sit down. The one still standing will be a millionaire”

2.  Delay Gratification — The prosperous have learned to resist the temptation to lose what matters most long-term for the short-term pleasure of something now.

3.  Value Financial Independence — The prosperous enjoy the security and independence of owning their possessions more than social praise and status.

4.  Live Below Income — For every $10 the prosperous make they spend $7. For every $10 dollars the poor make, they spend $13.

5.  Save Money for Tomorrow — Many spend tomorrow’s resources for today’s pleasures. The financially independent save and invest today’s money for tomorrow.

6.  Earn Interest — Interest is a very powerful tool that either builds or diminishes wealth. Those who understand interest earn it and those who don’t understand interest pay it.

7.  Pay Themselves First — You can become financially independent simply by paying 10 percent of your income to savings and investments first, and then living on the rest.

8.  Buy Wholesale — You can greatly decrease your expenses by learning how to buy items at wholesale and by always asking for a discount.

9.  Create Gold-Laying Goose — The prosperous create a gold-egg-laying goose (assets with passive income) and then live on the eggs. Those who have reached the ranks of prosperity have learned that money is of a prolific generating nature.

10. Master of Money — A 17th Century Proverb states, “If money be not thy servant, it will be thy master.” The prosperous have their money work for them, while the poor work for money.

*****

Cameron C. Taylor is a best-selling author, highly sought after speaker, and entrepreneur. Cameron is the author of the books Preserve, Protect, and Defend, Does Your Bag Have Holes? 24 Truths That Lead to Financial and Spiritual Freedom, 8 Attributes of Great Achievers, and Twelve Paradoxes of the Gospel. Cameron graduated with honors from business school and is the founder of several successful companies and charities. He is a founder of The Glorious Cause of America Institute and serves on its board of directors. Cameron is a recipient of the Circle of Honor Award for being an “exceptional example of honor, integrity, and commitment.” He lives in Idaho with his wife and children. Cameron is a gifted teacher who has been invited to speak at hundreds of meetings with excellent reviews.

Cameron’s books and lectures have been endorsed by Ken Blanchard, co-author of The One Minute Manager, Dr. Stephen R. Covey, author of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, Billionaire Jon Huntsman, Sr., Rich DeVos, owner of the Orlando Magic, William Danko, PhD, co-author of The Millionaire Next Door, and many others.

How to Become Rich Through Creating

How can you live into your full potential and get rich, even if you’re struggling now?

Leo Gura, Founder of Actualized.org and a self-professed personal development guinea pig, explains that in order to become rich it’s important to be a creator and exceptional in what you do. He also gives some solid tips on how to get past the excuses and roadblocks that stand in your way.

You have probably heard these ideas before. One of the recurring themes from experts telling us how to build wealth and become rich is to create value and start a business.

But of course that’s often easier said than done, and Leo says it in ways that might just resonate a little deeper. He doesn’t pull punches and encourages you to look in the right place for the solution.

Because the buck always stops with you.

 

You Wanna Be a Rockstar?

Continuing in our series of financially inspirational music videos — see If I Had a Million Dollars by the Barenaked Ladies and All Star by Smash Mouth — we bring you another Canadian band, like the former, singing about being a rockstar, like the latter.

Rockstar by Nickelback has been used at countless wealth-building seminars and in videos promoting the life of luxury. The video features a lot of actual stars, and it’s mostly just fun tongue-in-cheek stuff. In fact, much of the song is pretty silly.

But if you can really feel the possibility of experiencing some of the things in the video, it’s a good way to get prepped for making it happen.

I want a brand new house on an episode of Cribs
And a bathroom I can play baseball in
And a king size tub, Big enough for ten plus me
(Yeah, so what you need?)

I need a credit card that’s got no limit
And a big black jet with a bedroom in it
Gonna join the mile high club, At thirty-seven thousand feet
(Been there, done that)

I want a new tour bus full of old guitars
My own star on Hollywood Boulevard
Somewhere between Cher And James Dean is fine for me
(So how you gonna do it?)

I’m gonna trade this life For fortune and fame
I’d even cut my hair And change my name

‘Cause we all just wanna be big rockstars
And live in hilltop houses, drivin’ fifteen cars

How to be a Millionaire by Age 25

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg © Paul Sakuma, APYes, admit it, you want to be a millionaire. Most of us do. But is it possible to do it by age 25?

A lot of others have done it. If you’re past the quarter-century point you won’t make that goal, but there’s nothing to stop you from learning from their successes.

Each year, some Americans make their first million dollars before turning 25, including a few who are still in high school.

Among the traits they have in common are vision, smarts and determination.

A little luck never hurts.

Mark Zuckerberg

“Young people are just smarter,” Mark Zuckerberg, now 26, told a Stanford University audience in 2007. Three years earlier, Zuckerberg had helped launch the enterprise that came to be called Facebook and vaulted him into the ranks of the nation’s billionaires.

Here’s a look at nine other individuals who were millionaires before they were 25, with some of their advice for achieving success.

Michael Dell

Michael Dell, now 45, earned his first million at age 19. Dell dropped out of the University of Texas shortly after starting a computer company that sold directly to consumers, at prices lower than retail rivals could match.

By the time he was 24, the company now known as Dell (DELL, news) had revenues of $258 million. At last check, Dell’s estimated net worth was $13.5 billion.

His advice for young entrepreneurs: “You’ve got to be passionate about it,” he said in an interview with the Academy of Achievement. “I think people that look for great ideas to make money aren’t nearly as successful as those who say, ‘OK, what do I really love to do?

Catherine Cook

Catherine Cook, now 20, has been a millionaire for a couple of years. She and her brothers David and Geoff started myYearbook, a social-networking site popular with teens, in 2005, when Catherine and David were still in high school.

Her advice for young entrepreneurs: “Stop just thinking about it and make it happen. When you’re young is the best time to start your own business, as you do not have the responsibilities you will have when you’re older. The worst that can happen if you fail now is that you have firsthand experience to make your next venture a success.”

Sean Belnick

Sean Belnick, now 23, became a millionaire at 16. He started selling office chairs online, an endeavor that morphed into a company called BizChair.com. Along the way, Belnick earned a bachelor’s degree from Emory University’s Goizueta Business School.

His advice for young entrepreneurs: “It is never too early to start. . . . There’s a lot of great information on the Internet. Just do the research and find a way to do what you want to do.”

Jermaine Griggs

Jermaine Griggs, now 27, became a millionaire at 23 by pursuing his passion for teaching music. His website, HearAndPlay.com, is designed to help people learn to play piano, guitar or drums by ear, without reading sheet music. More than 2 million students download online lessons each year. Griggs’ plans include the launch of brick-and-mortar learning centers, a TV network and a magazine.

His advice for young entrepreneurs: “Understand the power of selling, not just things but yourself and your ideas. Study business. Study those who have come before you and find people with the same dreams and aspirations as you.”

Read the full article, including five more millionaires, on MSN.com.

If I Had a Million Dollars

And now for something completely different… or at least a lot more fun.

How will you spend you next millions dollars?

Learning about how to be rich and increase your prosperity is fantastic, and we post a lot here on those topics. But sometimes just listening to the right song will get you in the mood to attract wealth as well.

Probably the most famous song by The Barenaked Ladies — fellows from Toronto, like myself, that I got to meet and interview several times — is “If I Had a Million Dollars” (or “If I Had $1,000,000”). And it gets played at millionaire mindset seminars and workshops around the world.

Here they play it live at the DTE Energy Music Theater in Clarkston, Michigan in 2007.

Feel free to sing along for full effect…

If I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you a house, I would buy you a house

And if I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
I’d buy you furniture for your house, Maybe a nice Chesterfield or an ottoman

And if I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you a K-Car, A nice Reliant automobile
And if I had a million dollars, I’d buy your love

If I had a million dollars, I’d build a tree-fort in our yard
If I had a million dollars you could help, It wouldn’t be that hard

If I had a million dollars, Maybe we could put a little tiny fridge
In there somewhere, We could just go up there and hang out

Like open the fridge and stuff
And there’d all be foods laid out for us
Like little pre-wrapped sausages and things

They have pre-wrapped sausages, But they don’t have pre-wrapped bacon
Well, can you blame them? Yeah!

If I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you a fur coat, But not a real fur coat, that’s cruel

And if I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you an exotic pet, Yep, like a llama or an emu

And if I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you John Merrick’s remains, All them crazy elephant bones
And if I had a million dollars I’d buy your love

If I had a million dollars, We wouldn’t have to walk to the store
If I had a million dollars, We’d take a limousine, ’cause it costs more

If I had a million dollars, We wouldn’t have to eat Kraft Dinner
But we would eat Kraft Dinner

Of course we would, we’d just eat more
And buy really expensive ketchups with it
That’s right, all the fanciest Dijon ketchups

If I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you a green dress, But not a real green dress, that’s cruel

And if I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you some art, A Picasso or a Garfunkel

If I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
Well, I’d buy you a monkey, Haven’t you always wanted a monkey?
If I had a million dollars I’d buy your love

If I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
If I had a million dollars, If I had a million dollars
If I had a million dollars, I’d be rich!

10 Ways to Get Rich from Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett's 10 Ways To Get RichWhat does one of the richest men in the world say you should do if you too want to be rich? Obviously he’s a very good person to listen to on the topic, and here’s his advice.

With an estimated fortune of $62 billion, Warren Buffett is the richest man in the entire world. In 1962, when he began buying stock in Berkshire Hathaway, a share cost $7.50. Today, Warren Buffett, 78, is Berkshire’s chairman and CEO, and one share of the company’s class A stock worth close to $119,000. He credits his astonishing success to several key strategies, which he has shared with writer Alice Schroeder. She spend hundreds of hours interviewing the Sage of Omaha for the new authorized biography The Snowball. Here are some of Warren Buffett’s money-making secrets — and how they could work for you.

1. Reinvest Your Profits: When you first make money in the stock market, you may be tempted to spend it. Don’t. Instead, reinvest the profits. Warren Buffett learned this early on. In high school, he and a pal bought a pinball machine to put in a barbershop. With the money they earned, they bought more machines until they had eight in different shops. When the friends sold the venture, Warren Buffett used the proceeds to buy stocks and to start another small business. By age 26, he’d amassed $174,000 — or $1.4 million in today’s money. Even a small sum can turn into great wealth.

2. Be Willing To Be Different: Don’t base your decisions upon what everyone is saying or doing. When Warren Buffett began managing money in 1956 with $100,000 cobbled together from a handful of investors, he was dubbed an oddball. He worked in Omaha, not Wall Street, and he refused to tell his parents where he was putting their money. People predicted that he’d fail, but when he closed his partnership 14 years later, it was worth more than $100 million. Instead of following the crowd, he looked for undervalued investments and ended up vastly beating the market average every single year. To Warren Buffett, the average is just that — what everybody else is doing. to be above average, you need to measure yourself by what he calls the Inner Scorecard, judging yourself by your own standards and not the world’s.

3. Never Suck Your Thumb: Gather in advance any information you need to make a decision, and ask a friend or relative to make sure that you stick to a deadline. Warren Buffett prides himself on swiftly making up his mind and acting on it. He calls any unnecessary sitting and thinking “thumb sucking.” When people offer him a business or an investment, he says, “I won’t talk unless they bring me a price.” He gives them an answer on the spot.

4. Spell Out The Deal Before You Start: Your bargaining leverage is always greatest before you begin a job — that’s when you have something to offer that the other party wants. Warren Buffett learned this lesson the hard way as a kid, when his grandfather Ernest hired him and a friend to dig out the family grocery store after a blizzard. The boys spent five hours shoveling until they could barely straighten their frozen hands. Afterward, his grandfather gave the pair less than 90 cents to split. Warren Buffett was horrified that he performed such backbreaking work only to earn pennies an hour. Always nail down the specifics of a deal in advance — even with your friends and relatives.

5. Watch Small Expenses: Warren Buffett invests in businesses run by managers who obsess over the tiniest costs. He one acquired a company whose owner counted the sheets in rolls of 500-sheet toilet paper to see if he was being cheated (he was). He also admired a friend who painted only on the side of his office building that faced the road. Exercising vigilance over every expense can make your profits — and your paycheck — go much further.

Read the last 5 ways on WarrenBuffett.com.

Become a Millionaire Before 30

http://rack.3.mshcdn.com/media/ZgkyMDEzLzA3LzExL2ZlL0Fhcm9uMjBQaXRtLjI4YWZlLmpwZwpwCXRodW1iCTIwMHgyMDAjCmUJanBn/efaa0a01/eaf/Aaron%2520Pitman-1645.jpgImagine making your first million before you turned 30. Kind of seems like you’d be set for life.

Well, that’s exactly what self-made millionaire and Angel Investor Aaron Pitman did. He is the Founder and Partner of RA Domain Capital, a domain name development firm.

Now he wants to help you become a millionaire before 30 — or whatever age you happen to be turning — too.

If there is one universal truth, it’s that everyone is looking to get rich quick. This probably explains why so many people are willing to believe there’s a Nigerian prince out there with their email address, ready and willing to mail them money. Truth is, whether looking for your dream job or starting up a new company, too many young people are looking to strike gold as quickly and easily as possible.

As someone who made my first million before I turned 30, the question of how to become a young millionaire often arises. Unfortunately, I don’t know of any magic pill to take or button to press to become instantly successful.

For starters, I followed the 10,000 hour rule of mastering any subject, deferring parties in college to spend sleepless nights working on business plans with a select group of other broke overachievers. Along with my 13 other roommates, I spent most of my formative “party” years working hard, mastering skills and eating a lot of Ramen noodles.

I know it’s possible to become wealthy early in life if you have the drive, determination and ambition to succeed. Here are a few tips that helped me achieve success and just might help you, too.

1. Confess and Attack

As a young worker, most people will see your age as your biggest hurdle and most pressing handicap. But the truth is that your youth just might be your biggest advantage.

So many of the people I networked with and contacted were older (sometimes much older) than myself. Often, these people knew they wanted to get hooks into the online space but just didn’t understand how the game was played online. They were actually looking for someone hungry and motivated, but best of all, they were looking for someone who had grown up around technology and understood the market.

Still, there is definitely a real perceived disadvantage to being a young and “inexperienced” worker or entrepreneur. This is when I began to formulate my “confess and attack” strategy. I would tell potential business partners the fairly evident truth: I’m young. But this doesn’t mean I don’t know what I’m doing or that I haven’t put in the time and energy to become an expert in my field.

Once I confessed what we both knew and explained my skills, I would attack their preconceived notions. I would push the conversation back to them, explaining if they weren’t comfortable with me or my team after understanding my skills, then perhaps we weren’t a good business fit.

I took back control of the situation and found business partners who actually believed in me and my ability to succeed, instead of jittery investors ready to bail at the first signs of trouble.

2. Your Socializing Can Determine Your Success

As a young job seeker or entrepreneur, your network is key. Think of the old saying, “Show me who your friends are and I’ll tell you who you are.” This is as true for the business world as it was when your mom said it about that one friend you had in high school who was always trying to get you to skip class.

Read the full story on Mashable.